The Day – Infowars Bankruptcy Can’t Let It Escape Responsibility


Alex Jones, who founded the factory of lies called Infowars, is desperate to escape responsibility for his heinous words and actions. On Monday, just weeks after Jones dangled $120,000 each to the Sandy Hook families who won a libel suit against him for repeatedly claiming that the massacre of 20 children and six staff members at the school was a hoax (an offer they rightfully rejected within hours)‚ InfoWars filed for bankruptcy, claiming to have $50,000 or less in assets and between $1 million and $10 million in liabilities. Two other affiliated entities, IWHealth and Prison Planet TV, had similar bloody stories.

How does the same Jones who said he was willing to pay plaintiffs more than $1.5 million — a transparent offer to bypass discovery and a lawsuit, which is now proceeding to determine damages despite the fact that Jones has already lost the trial by default judgment – later pleading poverty? That’s up to Connecticut Judge Barbara Bellis to settle.
We are confident that, as she does, she will acknowledge that Jones clearly did not seek bankruptcy protection on her behalf or on behalf of Free Speech Systems, both of which are also named defendants in the lawsuit, and who will continue likely to hold significant assets. When it comes time for the peddler to pay, he cannot turn three of his pockets inside out while keeping the other two buttoned.

The quest for justice continues for those who are psychologically tormented by being told that their children were in fact not murdered, being labeled as bereavement crisis actors, being hunted down and pursued by maniacal Jones supporters .
A month ago, Jones refused even to submit to a statement; Bellis set him right by scorning him and fining him $25,000 a day for each day he refused to comply. On April 5 and 6, after being rebuffed for $50,000, Jones finally appeared before a lawyer and collected his fine.

Limited bankruptcy protection? Perhaps. Immunity to consequences? Surely not.

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